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LCD vs. AMOLED

 

Samsung's been advocating the benefits of AMOLED displays for years, but it's doing it more frequently lately because it recently released its Galaxy Tab S 10.5 and Galaxy Tab S 8.4, the world's first high-res Super AMOLED tablets.

 

Without going into technical details, Samsung posted an infographic that shows why Super AMOLED screens are better than the LCD ones. Among the listed reasons you'll find a higher contrast ratio, wider viewing angles, and more accurate colors. Check the Infographic below.

 

 

Samsung sAMOLED

 



As per a recent report published by Strategy Analytics, Samsung is selling their smartphones at $465 less than Apple on an average. This conclusion was reached after the firm established that the average selling price of iPhones is $692 and that of the Samsung smartphones is $227. This data is still somewhat dated though, given that the parameters were last updated at the end of Q4, 2016.


You can probably guess that this isn't really a big surprise since Apple only sells premium smartphones, while Samsung does business in every budget category out there. The difference wasn't so shocking before though, but we are guessing that's an obvious effect of the tremendous competition from Chinese manufacturers, who continue to grow in the emerging markets. As Xiaomi, OnePlus and others continue to take over the budget and mid-range segments, Samsung has no choice but to lower the prices in order to stay competitive. They are nevertheless, still the leader in all segments on a global basis.


Saikat Kar (tech-enthusiast)


google

 

Google appears to have a cross-platform local file sharing service on the way. Dubbed Copresence, the upcoming offering will reportedly be a cross between Apple AirDrop and Android Beam.

 

Copresence will allow iOS and Android users to exchange a files, messages, photos, and directions among others. Google is purportedly set to add functionality to the service, which goes beyond exchange of files and information.

 

google

 

Device authentication is said to take place over Bluetooth. File transfers will happen through Wi-Fi or Wi-Fi Direct. The images you see have been extracted from the latest Google Play Services APK. Copresence API for Chrome has appeared in developer documentation as well. The service will be officially revealed on the upcoming weeks.

 

Source


Source: Pixabay


Ever since Apple launched 500 applications onto the App Store in July 2008, dramatically expanding the potential capabilities of their pricey initial smartphone effort, apps have become a part of the public consciousness. Today, "there's an app for that" has moved beyond hyperbole with more than 7 million apps available across the five major smartphone platforms, as of March 2017.


Quite simply, apps have changed the way many of us access services and games, becoming a fundamental part of our daily lives.


But with the 10-year anniversary of the App Store just around the corner, apps are actually suffering a fightback unlike any which they've ever seen before, and it's coming from an unlikely source - the technology they promised to replace, web browsers.


To understand the battle between apps and web browsers, it's vital to recognise exactly where the internet was 10 years ago. Websites had grown up in an era where mouse and keyboard inputs where commonplace and powerful computers were able to display graphics and Flash heavy websites with relative ease. With the launch of the iPhone though, which didn't support flash and relied on touch input and a weak processor, these websites were no longer fit for operation.


While many websites quickly launched "mobile" versions of their pages, they were often lacking in core capabilities and were, frankly, a little unpleasant to use. As such, apps became immensely popular thanks to their streamlined, specialist design. However, 10 years on, things have changed. New technologies on the browser side have improved loading times, improved game performance and more - in addition to designers getting to grips with the navigation requirements of smartphones and tablets.


It's meant that we're now in a situation where both apps and web pages offer a superb experience for consumers, which is obviously only a good thing, but with both vying for the attention of businesses, developers and consumers, it's clear that there can only be one winner in the long run. So, which is it to be? Let's take a look at the case for each.


Web pages


Source: Pixabay


Web browsers have been around for as long as the internet and, over the decades, they've grown into incredibly advanced pieces of technology - ones which have learned from the lessons laid down by smartphone apps.


With the launch of HTML5 in October 2014, browsers grew infinitely more capable, with the technology promoting high-resolution, low-requirement graphics which enable everything from superior YouTube performance to the popular slot game Gonzo's Quest running well on both mobile and desktop. The latter, a popular online slot game by developer NetEnt, is available both for mobile browsers and desktop browsers at online casinos such as Betsafe. HTML5 has meant that more than ever, the performance difference between web and app have diminished.


Web pages also have the advantage of being accessible regardless of the space you have on your device, making them available to almost anyone.


Apps


Source: Pixabay


Apps aren't going anywhere though - at least for the time being. With many operations existing entirely as apps, rather than launching websites, they're truly entrenched. Apps also benefit from being specially tailored to the devices they're on, often making use of specific hardware features which websites can't, owing to their need for universal support.


A mobile app can also function offline in many cases, although this is mitigated by the fact that mobile internet and free WiFi have effectively ensured that we're rarely without accessible internet.

 

Which will win?


With Google working to bring mobile apps to the web through their Android Instant Apps program which allows users to visit websites to launch apps instantly without installation, it's clear that the distinction between the apps and the web is disappearing.


Ultimately though, with a future which features both still ahead of us, it's too early to tell which platform will win out. A free and open internet will always foster innovation and its low barriers to entry mean that it's unlikely to ever be replaced by apps. However, it's also the case that mobile apps do benefit significantly from their tight hardware integration and dedicated mobile design ethos.


Only time will tell, but we're excited to be along for the ride.



In a somewhat dismal presentation where certain features of the iPhone X failed on camera, Apple finally revealed the much awaited iPhone X to the world on September 12. While the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus were also launched on the same day, it would be cruel but safe to say that nobody really cares about them that much in light of the iPhone X. While the new poster boy for Apple is full of controversial and downright bizarre design choices, there is no doubt that when it comes to raw power, it's a beast and now we will take a look at the Geekbench scores revealed to us by ValueWalk to see just how powerful it really is in comparison to the Galaxy S8 and the Galaxy Note 8.



As you can see from the screenshot above, the iPhone X absolutely mops the floor with the S8 and the Note 8 in both single core and multi-core performance. Granted that the real world difference in performance will hardly be noticeable by users, it doesn't take away from the fact that the A11 chip is way ahead of anything that Samsung, Qualcomm or any other Android chip manufacturer might have up their sleeves anytime soon!


Saikat Kar (tech-enthusiast)


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