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OnePlus Pro 7

 

On Friday, OnePlus released a teaser in a tweet for its upcoming OnePlus 7 Pro phone. The company dunked its smartphone in awater bucket despite the fact that the phone doesn't have an official water-resistance IP rating. And it is trying to show that even without the un-necessary rating phone has water resistance.


The company has taken a stance on IP ratings for resistance to water and dust. It suggests that getting the IP rating isn't cheap. To obtain official water and dust resistance the companies have to spend money and the smartphone manufacturers are transferring that cost down to its customers.
OnePlus seems confident enough that the OnePlus 7 Pro will have enough resistance against water that it can easily withstand a good water-bucket dunk. Still, the company doesn't suggest you to intentionally expose its upcoming smartphone to water. The fine print in the video says "Water resistant under optimal test conditions.


OnePlus makes no guarantees regarding water/liquid resistance." This means that if you are exposing your OnePlus 7 to water, you are responsible for any damage and the company isn't entitled to pay any money for the repair or bound to replace the phone if it does more harm to the phone.
This kind of written warning isn't a new thing. You may find the same printed text on phones that have a high official IP rating. Apple's support page has a disclaimer about any water damage which says, "if liquid damages an iPhone or iPod (for example, coffee or a soft drink), the service for the liquid damage isn't covered by the Apple One-Year Limited Warranty."


You have to buy AppleCare Plus for $6 per month and pay another $100 for the repair, which is what you have to pay even if the iPhone doesn't have an official IP rating. To be fair, the official IP rating is just for peace of mind. In the case of OnePlus Pro 7 you have to take its word for it.



Samsung had to kill the Note 7 after a second worldwide recall was initiated and that has cost the South Korean giant quite dearly. Apart from the billions of dollars that Samsung had to shell out in order to recall all the Note 7 smartphones and refund its customers, there is no telling how much this incident will hamper Samsung's business in the long run. According to Ming-Chi Kuo from KGI Market analyst firm, Samsung may lose as much as 5 to 7 million customers to Apple's iPhone 7 in the remainder of this year alone.


About 12 million units of the Note 7 were ordered and since each and every one of those customers will now have to opt for another smartphone, the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus are lucrative alternatives for them. The iPhone 7 Plus in particular will appeal to most of the ex-Note 7 customers, due to its large display, dual rear camera setup and a price tag that's quite similar to the Note 7. A portion of the remaining customers will of course stay loyal to Samsung by choosing the Galaxy S7 Edge or some other Samsung device. Other contenders for the sales gap created by the untimely death of the Note 7 are mainly the Google Pixel XL and the LG V20. We are not entirely sure about the report, but only time will tell if the Note 7 disaster is enough to make so many people change loyalties.


Saikat Kar (tech-enthusiast)



As you probably know already, the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 is dead and chances of the smartphone ever resurfacing are almost none. However, Samsung would like to keep their customers from going elsewhere and that is exactly why they are offering $100 to all Note 7 customers who are willing to switch over to another Samsung smartphone, rather than leaving the brand completely or asking for a full refund. The extra $100 will be given to the customer via bill credit. Although this incentive is only available to the customers in the US at the moment, Samsung is expected to extend similar offers to other regions as well.


Here's the official statement by Samsung, "As a sign of our appreciation for your patience and loyalty, we are offering up to a $100 bill credit from select carrier or retail outlets if you exchange your Galaxy Note 7 for another Samsung smartphone, less any incentive credits already received."


Just in case you want nothing to do with Samsung smartphones for a while, most retailers and carriers will give you your money back, along with a $25 bonus. If you plan to switch to a different brand, you will still get a $25 bonus from most of them. Please note that if you had already exchanged your Note 7 when the first recall was initiated, the $25 bonus which you received then will be subtracted in all three scenarios.


Saikat Kar (tech-enthusiast)



Unless you are living in a cave or some deserted island, you probably know that the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 did not pan out well after defective batteries in some of the units started to explode soon after the sales began. The good news is that Samsung acknowledged the problem fast and issued a global recall of the 2.5 million devices that it had sold so far. However, the process has not been very smooth as only 130,000 units have been replaced/refunded so far out of the one million devices sold in the US. In order to highlight the importance of the matter, Tim Baxter, the president of Samsung Mobiles US, has apologised and stressed on the graveness of the subject through an official video. Here are a few important excerpts from his speech of apology to the customers.


"...and with battery cell defects on some of our Note 7 phones, we did not meet the standard of excellence that you expect and deserve. For that, we apologise, especially to those of you who were personally affected by this."


"The CPSC has worked closely with us to develop, expedite, and execute a plan to protect American users. We notified them of a potential defect in the original Note 7 batteries, then issued a global directive to stop sales immediately. To date, we already have exchanged 130,000 units. A fast and meaningful start."


"We will continue implementing corrective steps to exchange every single Note 7 on the market," Baxter continued. He also reiterated that the exchange process is an adequate solution to the ongoing problem. "To be clear, the Note 7 with the new battery is safe... This finding has been affirmed by a recognized, independent, lithium battery expert."


"To our Note 7 owners: if you have not yet replaced your original Note 7, please, please, power it down and return it."


"New Note 7 phones will be available for exchange no later than next Wednesday."


While it still is a huge blunder, one must admit that Samsung is showing a lot of class in the way that they are handling the entire situation.


Saikat Kar (tech-enthusiast)



Samsung had earlier announced that customers in the US should start receiving safe replacements for their hazardous Note 7 smartphones by September 21 and they have kept their promise. Reports indicate that Samsung has already started to distribute the new batch of smartphones to the customers and resellers here in the US. We guess Tim Baxter (COO, Samsung Mobiles US) meant it when he proclaimed the aforementioned deadline in an official apology video, in which he also requested all customers to immediately power down their devices and contact Samsung for a replacement or a refund.



Apparently, Best Buy is one of the first resellers in the US to notify their customers about the replacements having arrived. Although we are not sure, but Best Buy is probably also the only reseller right now that's providing the replacement Galaxy note 7 smartphones to their customers. Nevertheless, we are pretty sure that the other resellers and carriers will pick up on it before September 21. Now that Samsung has guaranteed safety with their new batch of Note 7s, will you be opting to buy one or would you choose something else from what the competition has to offer?


Saikat Kar (tech-enthusiast)


iphone plus

 

It was only yesterday that the iPhone 6 duo went on sale in China and we're already hearing the first juicy reports.

 

Apparently, China Unicom, the country's second biggest carrier, has hired on-site tailors for its store in Shanghai to offer the service of pocket enlargement to those customers who opt for the bigger iPhone 6 Plus.

 

It's highly unlikely however that these "Pocket Plus" adjustment services are anything more than a cleverly devised publicity stint. Big-screen smartphones are no novelty in Asia and I doubt that customers there need any pocket adjustment to accommodate the late-to-the-big-screen-party iPhone.

 

 

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